Finding the Real Story in Your Historical Novel

Guest Post by Sam Osherson - Writing teacher Bonnie Freidman has discussed the problem of writers being “transfixed” by their material in a way that drains the story of its dramatic tension. Many writers face a reckoning, consciously or unconsciously, in the course of their novel when the original conception needs to be changed in … Continue reading Finding the Real Story in Your Historical Novel

How to Get the Press Coverage Your Historical Novel Deserves

Guest Post by Rebecca Rosenberg - I’ve worked in publicity and advertising since I was twenty and am constantly looking for ways to apply what I learned to publicize my novels. My newest book, Champagne Widows, takes place in the 1800s. What could possibly be newsworthy about that today? I’m going to share the methods … Continue reading How to Get the Press Coverage Your Historical Novel Deserves

Jazz, Flappers, and Prohibition: Researching the Roaring Twenties

Guest Post by Skye Alexander - Writing historical fiction requires doing a lot of research, which may sound tedious to some people. But once I started delving into the Roaring Twenties for the first historical mystery in my Lizzie Crane series, Never Try to Catch a Falling Knife, I was rewarded with all sorts of … Continue reading Jazz, Flappers, and Prohibition: Researching the Roaring Twenties

Historical Fantasy: Fantastic Answers to Historical Questions

Guest post by Matthew Lucas - One of the pleasures of writing historical fantasy is working within the weave between the facts of history and the flights of “fantasy,” or, as W.R. Irwin set the term, the “overt violation of what is generally accepted as possibility.” Whether it’s following a golem around the Lower East … Continue reading Historical Fantasy: Fantastic Answers to Historical Questions